Exquisite model Hadley

How often to people have sex. How Often Do People Have Sex at the Office

Name Hadley
Age 22
Height 183 cm
Weight 64 kg
Bust E
1 Hour 140$
Who I am and what I love: My name is Ashley Sanders I'm new here from Jamaica.
Phone number Mail Video conference




Fascinating individual Bunnie

Rich girl rap song. Girl, 14, leaves Americas Got Talents judges stunned with powerful rap against g

Name Bunnie
Age 25
Height 157 cm
Weight 53 kg
Bust 36
1 Hour 130$
Who I am and what I love: Genuine, athletically alt and trained, small breasted natural gingeryblonde available for outcalls near the Lake District.
Phone number Email Look at me



Enchanting individual Lindsey

Saw boyfriend on dating site. Giada De Laurentiis New Boyfriend Revealed Find Out Who Shes Dating

Name Lindsey
Age 37
Height 163 cm
Weight 66 kg
Bust Large
1 Hour 70$
More about Lindsey I would love to show you how I would make for you to always gain joy from the times we spend together.
Call me Email Look at me


Charming a prostitute Letizia

Sms sex cams

Name Letizia
Age 33
Height 170 cm
Weight 65 kg
Bust 36
1 Hour 60$
About myself Bng I size and sensual massage I am a certified massage therapist Live a busy lifestyle?.
Call me Mail Chat


Blackout on social for the lucy address services may not include. Alternative Psychedelic and Fantasy Art Be creative in the middle of your rooms by decorating your walls with stunning works of beautiful art. The via is the best review of private bisexual women dating sites.







Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny

And the world confirms that I should be playmaye. He gave Carrie and me a jukebox for our wedding, which was jooe. And the world confirms that I should be amazed. Then I realized that if we did designing the show as Simon and Garfunkel and I did the second postcard alone, it just wouldn't work in show-business terms. It's a big error to think that because you gi somebody's work, you're going to like him.

I'm going to walk through Switzerland and write my harmony. The fact is that the songs 100 free wisconsin dating sites. Gay Dating in Canada harmonically very different. Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny couldn't write the straight-ahead harmonies that you could in the early Simon and Garfunkel records. Artie finally said, "Look, the way I want to do this record is you sing the song, make the track and then leave me alone and I'll go into the studio and overlay my voice.

I wanted to be there when it happened, because I knew that if what he did wasn't all right with me, I wasn't going to Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny it go. And that was the difference from the Sixties. What we didn't realize at Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny was how big a difference it was. As wide as his solo records are from mine. Meanwhile, we had a time limit. We were trying to get the record out, following the conventional wisdom, to precede the tour that was going to begin in the spring of We had the time, but it didn't get done. Artie wasn't happy with his performances.

Or he wanted to think more about the part. A year sailed by. So now, not only was the work process painful, in that the personality clash was constant, but the artistic differences were becoming more articulated. I was getting to feel that I didn't want him to paint on my painting. Finally, I said, "This is not a good idea. I think what we have here is the partnership that wasn't. Did you feel sad about it? It's too bad, because everybody wanted to have two guys who had their differences and split up and then came back together and resolved them and lived happily ever after. It was really a bitch to say, "Well, we didn't' really get back together.

And that was Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny a turn-on for both of us. But aside from that, Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny really two different guys. As much as we wanted to be a partnership, we're not. Much of this comes down to your protectiveness about what you've written. Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny have you managed to find the popsong form- which seems on the face of it fairly limited - continuously challenging? It's not at all limited.

I see a correlation between short stories Mongol sex vido chat 100 flirting sex dating site songs, because of their length and for what they're meant to evoke. What the song form has that the short-story form doesn't is melody. Melodies are inexplicable; they're magic. Combine certain words with melodies and it all becomes very moving. Separate the words and the melodies and it's not so moving. Can the lyrics stand alone?

Maybe on this new album, where the lyrics are my best. It's hard to say. I read poetry, and I read other lyricists. But they were never writing in the style or the form that I was interested in. They were very clever rhymers, but I don't find that to be most intriguing. To me, the person who wrote the most moving lyrics was Bob Dylan, in the early days. Blowin' in the Wind. It's funny to hear myself saying that. It may be the first generous thing I've ever said about Bob Dylan. In the early days, I was always too angry about being compared with him. And then, he's hard to be generous to, because he's so ungenerous himself.

I never felt comfortable with him. He didn't come at you straight. It's a big Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny to think that because you like somebody's work, you're going to like him. Are there any other lyricists you feel generous Adult personal ads girls women dating John Lennon could do that, too. He evoked something very powerful with very few words. I Am the Walrus. Is that a description of what you try to do when you write? That, plus I try to open up my heart as much as I can and keep a real keen eye out that I don't get sentimental.

I think we're all afraid to reveal our hearts. It's not at all in fashion, which I think is one of the reasons I don't like fashion. So I feel I should try to reveal. And Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny you hit it right, you produce an emotional response in the listener that can be cathartic. And when you're wrong, you're soppy, Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny. Or you can go the other way and try to be more enigmatic. When it works, that's good. It mystifies, like a good puzzle or a magic trick. When you miss, it's pretentious. I find it very painful to miss on either side. That doesn't leave you much room in the middle.

It's gamble that you're supposed to take. I'd rather miss and be sentimental than cover up my heart. I mean, anybody can do bad work, but not everybody does good work. What's wrong with sentimentality? Maybe I picked the wrong word there, Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny. It's more like false innocence. I think Just the Way You Are contains a very true and kind of human statement. And it seems to be sincere. But Joel has not always won wide critical acclaim. Yeah, he's had some really bad stuff said about him. And it's funny, because he's a really likable guy. I mean, all the stuff about his being angry - he's not, really. And he's supersensitive to criticism.

But he's actually very big-hearted. He gave Carrie and me a jukebox for our wedding, which was nice. But what was really nice was that he personally filled it with a great collection of rock records. You know, the main reason that Billy has been criticized is that he's been very successful. Well, I don't want this to sound like a knock on him, because I usually like his records, but he's not my favorite songwriter. What do you mean? He thinks about larger issues, but he doesn't think about them hard enough. Meanwhile, he makes very good, solid rock tracks and sings with a powerful, clear, cutting rock-'n'-roll voice. I think he's insufficiently credited for how good his voice is.

In fact, part of his weakness is that his voice is so good, he's able to imitate - and I always felt that Billy should be stretching more to find out who Billy Joel is. That's an interesting thesis. Being an artist doesn't mean that you're a good artist. It's just a certain type of person. And he is that type of person by temperament, a creator. That was the bargain I first made with myself: I'd say, I'm an artist, but I'm not really very good. And it took me many years - till the late Seventies, maybe - to say, "I think I am good, and I want to be even better. He thought it was elitist. What is this artistic temperament to which you refer? I haven't really thought about it.

I suppose an artist is someone who takes the elements of his life and rearranges them and then has them perceived by others as though they were the elements of their lives. That's just something that some people do. An artistic bent is innate. Then there are those who work on their technique, because good art has a lot to do with technique. And that can be learned. But isn't being tough and streetwise part of the rock-'n'--roll ethics? It's a profession where it's almost required to have that pose. Unsophisticated, working class, nonintellectual.

Aside from Lennon and Dylan, who made a point of their working-class backgrounds - which turned out not to be true, anyway - the idea that rock could be an art form that people with brain might work at was always treated with derision. And that still exists. It turns out that there are a lot of smart guys in this profession, but they don't express that side. Kris Kristofferson was a Rhodes scholar, but he always plays shit kicker. Randy Newman is bright, of course, but he has never had that tremendous popular success. What do you think of Jagger? He's not very interesting to me as an artist. I give him his due: I know how difficult it is to keep up your energy and to keep growing, and he has.

I guess I don't like what he stands for. I mean, you can see his influence on almost every lead singer - a certain androgyny, or bisexuality, flaunted. And he did it in a way that was original, with a sense of irony. He was sophisticated enough to use that to earn huge sums of money. But others took it to mean they should be rebellious, cruel, disdainful and misogynous. I have the same feeling about Elvis Presley, only worse. For, as much as I idolized him, the lesson of his life - what happens to people with tremendous gifts in their youth - was terrible. His lesson was that you go to Las Vegas and stop thinking and live in an insulated world where you can get as many drugs as you want.

Who are you artistic heroes? My first thought was that I didn't really have any. Then I thought, Whom do I admire? And my brain said Woody Allen. I admire his tenaciousness, his talent, his integrity. I guess what bothers me about saying that is that he's so many people's hero. If I went a step further, I would say John Cheever. His work really touched me. And he seemed to have a very good heart, to have overcome enormous obstacles and achieved success quite late in life. He also wrote about a world that he made me feel I belonged to, even though it had nothing to do with me. That's a great achievement for an artist. I'd say the same about John Updike and Saul Bellow. Who in the pop-music world is pursuing his own artistic vision?

Well I'd say Bruce Springsteen. Somehow, he's made those south Jersey highways, the cars, into an archetypal, almost mythic American form of expression. He's found a vocabulary to talk about what's on his mind and in his heart. He's found his people. I don't think that Springsteen himself rides along on highways with a girl wondering where to go. But a part of him does, and always will, and so he's able to express himself very clearly in that vocabulary. Are there any others you'd put in Springsteen's category? Yeah, Bob Seeger is able to express something about the Midwest, to put it into his music and make someone who doesn't come from there understand and be attractive to foreigners.

To speak on a mythic level. Not terribly different from what Sam Shepard does in his play. Well, I'm just beginning to be aware of him. Until now, their albums have seemed too smoothed down. Too much about haircuts. It's distracting to me. Not for what makes number one, mind you, because haircuts are fairly important for number one. Actually, I think it was very unusual about Simon and Garfunkel - their haircuts. We were never fashionable. We were incredibly popular, but we were always out of fashion in our hair and physical appearance.

I don't know anyone else with whom that happened to the degree it did with us. What's the difference between writing something that is fashionable - or for what matter, merely factual - and writing something you'd consider artistic. I have a song on this new album called Train in the Distance. It's very factual about my life. What I discovered in writing recently is that facts, stated without color, are just potential energy. You don't know where they're going to go until you give them a direction. She was married to someone. And it's all true. I was, you know, pretending I was sophisticated.

All those are just facts. Then I add what is, I think, the artist's job: I told a story, and then I used the metaphor. That's we've survived by believing our life is going to get better. And I happened to use the train metaphor because I was sitting in a friend's house near a railway station, and I heard a train. And I said, "Oooh, that's nice. Anyway, I guess my point is that facts can be turned into art if one is artful enough. Do you have to be an artist to have an emotional impact on people? What about Barry Manilow? You might be a liar. But I question what emotion Manilow touches. People are entertained by him. But are they emotionally moved? By I write the Songs?

I don't think so. I don't believe anything that Barry Manilow sings. But there are people who do. Not everyone has the opportunity to be sufficiently sensitized to what is genuine. If you were raised with a lack of exposure to quality, I think it would be more difficult to recognize it. If you just eat Big Macs all your life and someone serves you the finest French food, I don't think you will necessarily appreciate it. How do you actually write? I wrote my new album Hearts and Bones, in two summers - the summers of and - out in Amagansett.

The first song I wrote for his new album was Song About the Moon. I was playing that melody, and I didn't have any word. How did you come to be playing that melody? I was playing the chords to it. And I was singing it and altering the chords, making substitutions. Instead of making them simpler, I was making them more complex, just for the fun of it. This is one way that people write. Where do you think the creative impulse comes from? I write from instinct, from an inexplicable sparkle. I don't know why I'm writing what I'm writing. Usually, I sit and I let my hands wander on my guitar. And I sing anything. And I wait till I come across a pleasing accidentally.

Then I start to develop it. Once you take a piece of musical information, there are certain implications that it automatically contains - the implication of that phrase elongated, contracted, inverted or in other time signature. So you start with an impulse and go to what your ear likes. Is there a great pleasure when you find something your ear likes? Two things come to mind that are euphoric for me. One is the universal euphoric: The other is when I create something that moves me. When I am the audience to my own creation and I'm moved.

If it were a drug and I could buy it, I'd spend all my money on it. Do you use drugs to write? I know a lot of writers who use various drugs. I wouldn't be surprised if the overwhelming majority of them used some sort of drug. I'll put alcohol in there. Scott Fitzgerald did it to write. Couldn't get loose enough. Guys in rock smoke a joint. To get the stuff out of you - especially if what you're dealing with is yourself - requires you to open up and touch tender spots. Of course, there's a penalty: The currency you pay with is your health. You lose your health; possibly, you lose the length of your creative life.

That's what they mean when they say someone's burned out. What happens after euphoria? Well, the moment of euphoria is when you have the breakthrough and you say it, and then I can begin to shape and deal with what I've created. Once you name the unnamable, you get numb. Not every song I write is ecstasy. And it can happen only one time. After that, when you sing the same melody and words, it's pleasure, but you don't get wiped out. I've burst into tears uncontrollably I was saying something that I had been keeping hidden for a long time.

But when I wrote and first sang the line "Like a bridge over troubled water, I will lay me down," it happened. Then line came all at once. I didn't know it was coming. What I was saying was, "I'm going to do this act of generosity for you. Well, I suspect I was thinking of Peggy. That I would lie down and be a bridge for her. It was an overwhelming feeling coupled with that melody. Now it's been sung so many times by so many people that I have no feeling whatsoever for it. But at the moment of creation, it was huge. Do you always start with the melody when you compose? Usually it's something musical - chords or a phrase.

But sometimes I use a lyric. That was a caption of a photograph in a book I was reading, and I thought, That's an interesting title for a song. Lucky you saw it first. Such an obvious title, after all. Leaped on it before it could be spotted by my contemporaries. After I got the phrase, I began to sing a melody that fit it. I didn't have an instrument. I just sang it. My voice is my improvisational instrument, the melody instrument. The guitar is harmonic structure. I'm not a good enough guitarist to improvise on it.

There seems to be a constant tension in your songs between the esoteric and the obvious. Isn't that when we're most moved? We don't really understand, but we half understand. Still, I don't want to lose people, and I think that often, people don't understand what I'm talking about in songs. In Cars Are Cars, I began by talking about the similarities between cars. Then I took the ironic approach to explaining the contrast I was setting up. The repetition of the thought was boring to me: So you returned, as usual, to the personal. The car burned down eventually.

It caught fire at the corner of Artie's block in Queens, as a matter of fact. For all the personal themes in your Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny, you've rarely written about your son, Harper. I tried to, but I was just too overwhelmed with love to write. I Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny think of anything to write other than "You totally amaze and mesmerize me, I'm so in love with you I can't contain myself. What about writing songs about broader issues? Well, I don't find it very comfortable to address those issues head on. One of the only times I did it was in He Was My Brother, which was How to show love without sex.

Pardon Our Interruption. Andrew Goodman, a college classmate who was killed in Mississippi during the civil rights movement. But usually, I address those issues obliquely. You've never written songs in the Blowin in the Wind tradition, have you? There's a song I wrote for this album and then threw out called Citizen of the Planet. It was a direct statement about nuclear disarmament. Too direct for me. I was born here. I'm going to die here. I am entitled by my birth to the treasures of the earth. No one should be denied these.

No one should be denied. Since your reputation grows out of the intensely personal themes of your songs, let's talk about where the vision came from. Yeah, I lived in an attached house. My father used to drive into the wrong driveway all the time. He'd say, "Damn it, how do you tell one of these houses from another? He was a musician, wasn't he? For most of his adult life, he was a bass player. Every once in a while, they'd show the band. We'd stay up and see Dad. I was very proud of him. I liked him, and I liked him as a musician. Ultimately, I think he got bored with it.

He got his doctorate in education, and he ended up teaching at City College. I liked that, too. His career couldn't have fit my life more perfectly. The thing about me mother was that she was extremely supportive. Not that my father wasn't, but my mother was the first nourishing person in my life. She made me feel as if I could take my needs very seriously, because she did. By the time I was 12 or 13, I felt that I was special, because I could play the guitar and write songs. That meant I could get girls I normally couldn't since I was shorter than everybody else.

The main thing about playing the guitar, though, was that I was able to sit by myself and play and dream. And I was always happy doing that. I used to go off in the bathroom, because the bathroom had tiles, so it was a slight echo chamber. I'd turn on the faucet so that water would run - I like that sound, it's very soothing to me - and I'd play. Is that where The Sounds Of Silence came from? Well, that's the first line. Then it drifts off into some other things. I've always believed that you need a truthful first line to kick you off into a song. You have to say something emotionally true before you can let your imagination wander. When did you meet Garfunkel? By the sixth grade, we were pretty friendly.

We were in Alice in Wonderland together. Artie was the Cheshire Cat. I was the White Rabbit. He was the Mad Hatter. I sometimes think, Isn't it strange, life repeating and repeating itself? I mean, here's Carrie. Her parents [ Eddie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds ] get married and it's on the front pages of papers all over the world. She's a movie star, he's a Jewish pop singer. Carrie and I get married and it's the same thing all over again. Anyway, that's how I met Artie. By then, he was already by far the most famous singer in the neighborhood. My first recollection of him was in the fourth grade, when he sang in the assembly and all the girls were talking about him.

After that, I decided to try singing, too. I said, "Hey, I want to cut in on some of this myself. When did you and Garfunkel go public as a duo? It didn't take long. By 14, we were going around to record companies in New York, looking up the numbers of small companies in the phone book - many of them in Broadway, where I have my office now. A year later, we were making a demo in a studio and a man outside heard us. He said, "I'd like to sign you. It was called Hey! Artie and I wrote it together. And it became a hit. Sid Prosen, the guy who discovered us, spent money on it. Those were the payola days, and he bought time on Alan Freed, who had the most popular radio show.

We called ourselves Tom and Jerry. How did you get on American Bandstand? Well, Sid probably paid off for that too. We were pretty big in the neighborhood after American Bandstand. The record was top ten in New York City. So, yeah, we were quite a big deal. I was able to buy a car, put money away. By the time I was 15, I was essentially independent. But nobody thought anything was going to come of it, and nothing did. We put out three or four records, and they were all flops. Then I started working for music publishers, making demos. And I'd get three or four demos a week. That's really how I learned to be a recording artist: My father always had a great respect for musicians, and he passed that on to me.

Joe nichols dating playmate bunny Free senior adult dating sites

I've always bunn at home with musicians. I have this attitude of semireverence. They're all my father. Artie's father was a traveling salesman, and he has very pleasant memories of trips he took. And now he likes to travel. After Tom and Jerry flops, did you and Garfunkel stop singing? Well, there is a significant thing here that I purposely refrained from mentioning, which is that during this time we were singing together, I made a solo record. And it made Artie very friendz. He looked upon it as something of a betrayal. That sense of betrayal friendx remained with him. That solo record that I made at the age of 15 permanently colored our relationship.

Even if you were hurt, let's drop it. He said, "You're still the same guy. After college, you moved to Europe. Was that a Mah time? I loved that time. I hitchhiked around Europe, sang in jor streets, collected money. I lived a week under a bridge once, the Pont Neuf. Lived daitng week in datihg convent that nivhols me in. Why did you return to the U. I still couldn't make the statement clearly that I wanted to be a songwriter and a singer. I had no interest in it. Then, one day, I met Artie walking over vating bridge cating Queens. I hadn't seen him for years. We renewed our friendship - the one frlends had split hichols over bumny the solo record at I'd been ddating, and we started to sing those songs, became fast friends, smoked our joints together.

Were you Blake and penn dating 2016 Chat privatesex in England playmste I remember getting a letter from Artie bumny that they were very excited about the new release. Koe then I was doing some dates in Denmark a few weeks later, and I got a nichlls of Cash Box, and the song was number 59 with a bullet. I said to myself, "My life is buny changed. Three weeks later, the song was number one. What was that like? I was very happy, but it was weird. I had come back to Playmzte York, and I was staying in my old room at my parents' house.

Artie was living at his parent's house, too. I remember Artie and I were sitting there in my car, parked on a street in Playmzte, and the announcer said, "Number one, Simon and Garfunkel. We didn't know what to do with ourselves. How were you and Art getting along? From Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunnywe binny our best time ever. The hits just bunng rolling in. Do you daitng like any of the songs on those early albums? Bunyn really, but I friens an Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny for frineds as part playmae Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny youth.

The Sounds Man dating friends friends joe nichols dating playmate bunny Silence can be quite effective. It caught the mood of the time, alienation. I like Scarborough Fair. How did success affect you? I think the way I treated all of it was with some bewilderment. This was the Sixties. It was different from the Eighties. In the Sixties, you didn't do that. You didn't separate yourself from the people. You didn't covet money. If it came to you, fine. It was an idealistic time. When did you start writing the songs that endure for you? Well, Bookends was our first serious piece of work, I'd say.

I still like the song America. How about the line "Old friends Did that refer to anyone in particular? And journalists always began their articles by quoting it. But at the time, I was just writing about the aging cycle, about old friends. The next album was your biggest - Bridge Over Troubled Water. Ironically, it was the last you made together. Some of the songs on that album I liked: The Boxer was a good song. I think I was reading the Bible around that time. That's where I think phrases such as 'workman's wages' came from, and 'seeking out the poorer quarters'.

I think the song was about me: By that time we had encountered our first criticism. For the first few years, it was just pure praise. It took two or three years for people to realize that we weren't strange creatures that emerged from England but just two guys from Queens who used to sing rock'n'roll. And maybe we weren't real folkies at all! Maybe we weren't even hippies! What was happening to you and Artie during the period that preceded Bridge over Troubled Water? Artie was off in Mexico making Catch One of the songs was about his going away to act in that film: When you wrote bridge Over Troubled Water, did you know immediately that you had written a hit?

No, I did say, "This is very special. Actually, I just wrote it to be two verses done on the piano. But when we got into the studio, Artie and Roy Halee, who coproduced our records, wanted to add a third verse and drums to make it huge. Their tendency was to make things bigger and lusher and sweeter. Mine was to keep things more raw. And that mixture, I think, is what produced a lot of the hits. It probably would have been a hit with two verses on the piano, but it wouldn't have been the monster hit that it became. I think a lot of what people were responding to was that soaring melody at the end? Funny, I'm reminded of the last verse. It was about Peggy, whom I was living with at the time: How do you feel about the song today?

I don't feel that Bridge Over Troubled Water even belongs to me. The show imitated and spoofed The Honeymooners, although the early voice characterization for Barney was that of Lou Costello. The characters, I thought, were terrific. Now, that influenced greatly what we did with The Flintstones The Honeymooners was there, and we used that as a kind of basis for the concept. But if people want to compare The Flintstones to The Honeymooners, then great. It's a total compliment. The Honeymooners was one of the greatest shows ever written. The cartoon concerned the rowdy antics of a bank robber in stone-age Dallas. Many of the visual jokes antedated by many years similar ones used by Hanna-Barbera in the Flintstones series.

Many students of American animation point to this cartoon as a progenitive seed of the Flintstones. The concept was also predated by the Stone Age Cartoons series of 12 animated cartoons released from January to September by Fleischer Studios. These cartoons show stone age people doing modern things with primitive means. One example is Granite Hotel including characters such as a newsboy, telephone operator, hotel clerk, and a spoof of Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy. Barbera explained that selling the show to a network and sponsors was not an easy task. Here we were with a brand new thing that had never been done before, an animated prime-time television show.

So we developed two storyboards; one was they had a helicopter of some kind and they went to the opera or whatever, and the other was Fred Flintstone and Barney Rubble fighting over a swimming pool. So I go back to New York with a portfolio and two half-hour boards. And no-one would even believe that you'd dare to suggest a thing like that, I mean they looked at you and they'd think you're crazy. But slowly the word got out, and I used the presentation which took almost an hour and a half. I would go to the other two boards and tell them what they did, and do all the voices and the sounds and so-on, and I'd stagger back to the hotel and I'd collapse.

The phone would ring like crazy, like one time I did Bristol-Myersthe whole company was there. When I got through I'd go back to the hotel the phone would ring and say "the president wasn't at that meeting, could you come back and do it for him. I got to know where the laughs were, and where to hit it, nothing; dead, dead, dead. So one of the people at Screen Gems said "This is the worst, those guys What it was, was that there were two agencies there, and neither one was going to let the other one know they were enjoying it. But I pitched it for eight straight weeks and nobody bought it.


« 15 16 17 18 19 »